↑ Return to Gallery

John Power Photography

Spring and Overall RTE Photo Competition Winner 2005 - Daffodils in Belvoir

Spring and Overall RTE Photo Competition Winner 2005 – Daffodils in Belvoir

About John: I grew up under the Comeragh Mountains Co Waterford and undoubtedly the beauty of these hills and lakes influenced me to become a hobby photographer even if it took many decades to get going. However it was a picture of daffodils in the ‘Sweet Vale of Belvoir’ which brought some recognition when it won the Spring and Overall RTE Weather Photo Competition in 2005. I have had a number of pictures feature in this and other photo competitions/calendars.

JP and SK in the Sean Kelly Tour of Waterford 2010

JP and SK in the Sean Kelly Tour of Waterford 2010

My heroes are Sean Kelly and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. That’s enough about me rather permit me to offer a few more pix some of which have featured in competitions. Catherine took the pic of me in Clare colours (Dolmen Cycling Club) being presented a certificate for completing the Sean Kelly Tour of Waterford in 2010. Sean is perhaps the most famous son of my home area. I am unable to provide a pic of my other hero.

When Steve Fosset and Mark Rebholz flew across the Atlantic in 2005 in the replica Vicker’s Vimy recreating the famous Alcock and Brown flight and landed in Connemara, I was there and took a pic of the a/c and was honoured to have a pic taken with Steve. Earlier in the day, I was at work and we were were communicating with the Vimy via the big jets overhead as it inched its way across the ‘Pond’. We had a wonderful holiday in the American SW in 2008 and passed through the general area where sadly he disappeared in a light aircraft. The glorious mountains are the ‘High Sierras’.

Vimy Clifden GC

Vimy Clifden GC

Steve Fosset

Steve Fosset

Desert to High Sierras at Long Pines

Desert to High Sierras at Long Pines

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bunratty in Drizzle and Dungarvan Harbour in Moonlight featured in GoIreland/John Hinde calendars. The Top of Mahon Falls is another ‘weather photo’. That inner lake in the Coumalochs, Comeraghs is one of my favourite places.

 

Bunratty in Drizzle

Bunratty in Drizzle

Dungarvan Harbour in Moonlight

Dungarvan Harbour in Moonlight

Light Waves Inner Coumaloch

Light Waves Inner Coumaloch

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Catherine discovered a small old worn pic taken by her grand uncle Christy O’Riordan in which the neighbours in O’Neill St. Clonmel are gathered to listen to the 1933 Hurling All Ireland on the new fangled ‘wireless’. How many people remember that custom? I repaired the pic and it is now in the RTE archives. The child with his hand to his face is Catherine’s father who passed away last year.

 

Listening to Hurling All Ireland Kilkenny Lilmerick ONeill St Clonmel on the wireless 1933 Christy ORiordan

Listening to Hurling All Ireland Kilkenny vs Lilmerick ONeill St, Clonmel on the wireless 1933 Christy ORiordan

OGarney River in Spate Sixmilebridge

OGarney River in Spate Sixmilebridge

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nature is boss and demonstrates some of its enormous power in the flood waters of November 2009 sweeping past ‘The Miller’ in Sixmilebridge.

 

Takeoff Shannon

Takeoff Shannon

TWA Connie Shannon

TWA Connie Shannon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I took this pic (Takeoff Shannon) taking off from Shannon in 2006.  I was puzzled by the waterways and then realised that I was looking at Inishmacnaughton Island on the bottom right.  About two years later this island came into sharp focus when Frank Daly at work brought in an old black white pic of a TWA Constellation (the famous Connie) at Shannon and asked did we know anything about it.  I scanned and emailed the pic to TWA friend, Capt Lou Burns in Newport RI who circulated the pic to his retired TWA colleagues.  Sadly what came back was a US air accident report on the crash of this a/c on Inishmacnaughton Island in late December 1946.  I was then asked by Capt Jeff Hill, editor of their retired pilots association to assist in writing an account of the disaster for their mag.  I visited the island, met a number of people still alive who were on the island that night and relatives of people involved and did other research.  Connections were made on the other side of the Atlantic. This has been described as Ireland’s first major civil air disaster now largely forgotten but rediscovered because of an old photograph.  The entire front page of the first edition of the Clare Champion in 1947 was devoted to the accident and described the horrific scenes on the island that night and the heroic rescue of the survivors across the muddy channel separating the island and the mainland.  The crash location is in the lower right of the aerial pic and the channel can be seen.  The tide was out that fateful night, the stretcher bearers were knee deep in mud crossing the channel.  Later the tide came in and a boat could be used.  An account of this accident can be found in Michael O’Toole’s excellent book – Cleared for Disaster.

 

Images by John Power

 

Close
loading...